Resources for Mental Health Needs

Referral Hotlines

LIFENET
1-800-LIFENET
http://www.800lifenet.org/cms/
Free, 24-hour, confidential, multi-lingual, mental health and substance abuse Information in New York City, referral, and crisis prevention hotline staffed by trained behavioral health professionals.

The National Alliance on Mental Illness NAMI-NYC Metro Helpline
1.212.684.3264
E-mail: helpline@naminyc.org
Hours: M – Th: 12:00 – 7:00pm, Fridays: 12:00 – 6:00 pm
Information, support, referrals, and resources on mental illnesses, including how to navigate New York City’s mental health system. Calls are confidential and answered by trained family members or mental health consumers.

NAMI-New York State
1-800-950-3228
http://www.naminys.org/
Information, referrals and educational resources on mental illness.
NAMI-NYS ‘s Helpline

National Eating Disorders Association (NEDA) Helpline
1.800.931.227
http://www.nationaleatingdisorders.org/
NEDA supports individuals and families affected by eating disorders, and serves as a catalyst for prevention, cures and access to quality care. Helpline offers information and referrals.

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline
1-800-273-TALK (8255)
http://www.suicidepreventionlifeline.org
Free, 24-hour hotline available to anyone in suicidal crisis or emotional distress.

UJA Federation of New York’s J11 Information and Referral Center
http://www.ujafedny.org/find-help/
877- UJA- NYJ11 (1-877-852-6951)
For help with a wide range of mental health needs, J•1•1 resource specialists are available Monday through Friday from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., with 24-hour voice mail.
Mental Health Resources

FEGS Rego Park Counseling Center
97-77 Queens Boulevard, Rego Park
718.896.9090
Specializing in working with children, adolescents, and their families, offering individual, group, or family counseling to help with relationship and family problems, depression, job and career stress, alcohol and substance abuse, and other issues.

Goodtherapy.org
http://www.goodtherapy.org
Website containing information on different types of therapy, how to find a good therapist, what to expect in therapy and other resources on psychological and emotional healing.
For guidelines on choosing a therapist, see http://www.goodtherapy.org/blog/how-tofind-a-therapist/

The Jed Foundation
http://www.jedfoundation.org
An organization devoted to raising mental health awareness and preventing suicide and reducing emotional distress among college students.

 

Mental Health GPS (Guiding Parents through Services)
http://www.ujafedny.org/mental-health-gps/
Long Island and Queens
Call Miriam Turk, LCSW
F•E•G•S Health and Human Services System: 1.646.483.7859
Mental Health GPS is a free service sponsored by UJA-Federation of New York for families who have concerns about the mental health needs of their child or adolescent (through college-age). It is intended to help families navigate the mental-health system and provides access to family resource specialists located at mental-health agencies throughout the New York area.

National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI)
http://www.nami.org/
Comprehensive information and resources on mental illness.

The National Alliance on Mental Illness of Queens/Nassau (NAMI-Queens/Nassau)
http://www.namiqn.org
718.347.7284 or 1.516.326-0797
NAMI-Queens/Nassau is a support, education, and advocacy organization for the mental health community that serves families and individuals whose lives are affected by mental illness. It offers a variety of free programs, services and support groups.

NAMI Faith Net
http://www.nami.org/MSTemplate.cfm?Section=FaithNet_NAMI1&Site=FaithNet_NAMI&Template=/MSTemplate.cfm?Section=FaithNet_NAMI1&Site=FaithNet_NAMI&Template=/TaggedPage/TaggedPageDisplay.cfm&TPLID=66&ContentID=33925&micrositeID=176
“NAMI FaithNet is a network composed of members and friends of NAMI (National Alliance on Mental Illness). It was established for the purposes of (1) facilitating the development within the Faith Community of a non-threatening, supportive environment for those with serious mental illness and their families, (2) pointing out the value of one’s spirituality in the recovery process from mental illness and the need for spiritual strength for those who are caretakers, (3) educating clergy and congregations concerning the biologic basis and characteristics of mental illness, and (4) encouraging advocacy of the
Faith Community to bring about hope and help for all who are affected by mental illness.”

Pride of Judea Counseling Center
243-02 Northern Boulevard, Douglaston, NY 11362
Phone: (718) 423-6200
Helps people who are struggling with a range of emotional and social problems. Specialized services for adults and children include evaluation and assessment; crisis intervention as well as individual, couple, family, and group therapy. Professional staff fluent in Hebrew, Hindi, French, Korean, Russian, Spanish and Yiddish.
A program of the Jewish Board of Family and Children’s Services (JBFCS)

The Treatment Advocacy Center
http://www.treatmentadvocacycenter.org/
“The Treatment Advocacy Center is a national nonprofit organization dedicated to eliminating barriers to the timely and effective treatment of severe mental illnesses. The organization promotes laws, policies and practices for the delivery of psychiatric care and supports the development of innovative treatments for and research into the causes of severe and persistent psychiatric illnesses, such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.”
For more information on treatment non-compliance and helping loved ones accept treatment, see:  Amador, Xavier, PhD. I am Not Sick, I Don’t Need Help! How to Help Someone with Mental Illness Accept Treatment.  Bernstein, Elizabeth. “A Way Out of Depression: Coaxing a Loved One in Denial Into Treatment Without Ruining Your Relationship.” www.wsj.com.

 

Recovery from Substance Abuse

JACS (Jewish Alcoholics, Chemically Dependent Persons, and Significant
Others) and JACS Teens
http://www.jacsweb.org/
Phone: (212) 632-4600
JACS is dedicated to: “Encouraging and assisting Jewish alcoholics, chemically dependent persons and their families, friends and associates to explore recovery in a nurturing Jewish environment; Promoting knowledge and understanding of the disease of alcoholism and chemical dependency as it involves the Jewish community; and acting as a resource center and information clearinghouse on the effects of alcoholism and drug dependency on Jewish family life.”
Weekly Meeting: Explore Jewish Spirituality through the 12 steps. Every Monday: 6:15-7:15 p.m. JACS Office, 135 West 50th Street, 6th Floor. Contact Marilyn P. (212) 255-3712.
JACS is a program of the Jewish Board of Family and Children’s Services (JBFCS)

 

Alcoholics Anonymous
www.aa.org
For more information or to find a meeting:
Intergroup Association
307 Seventh Avenue
2nd Floor
New York, NEW YORK 10001
Phone: (212)647-1680
Site: www.nyintergroup.org
Email: generalinformation@nyintergroup.org

NYC Al-Anon
http://www.nycalanon.org/
“Al-Anon and Alateen Family Groups hold weekly meetings for the relatives and friends of alcoholics who share their experience, strength, and hope, in order to solve problems associated with the family disease of alcoholism. We believe the disease affects all members of the family, and that changed attitudes can aid recovery.” For more information or to find a meeting:

The Greater NY Al-Anon Family Intergroup, Inc.
4 W. 43rd, Suite 617 (5/6)
New York, NY 10036
Telephone: 212.941.0094 Fax: 212.941.6119
e-mail: nycalanon@verizon.net

Additional Information
This is only a sample of resources available. For additional resources or a confidential consultation, please contact Forest Hills Jewish Center/JBFCS Social Worker Ruth Kobrin at 718-263-7000, ext. 223.